Tag Archives: fruit

Maple Poached Pears

Maple Poached Pears

I discovered this recipe thanks to a post on Kitchen Stewardship. (It’s from a cookbook called The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook.) And it has transformed my life.

Do you know how wonderful a mouthful of soft, creamy pears, hot and drizzled with a spiced, mapley, buttery syrup is? I mean, really?!? It’s so simple, but absolutely amazing. My children especially like it with a scoop of ice cream, and for Christmas dessert I made some cinnamon ice cream using maple syrup as a sweetener that went with it perfectly! But it’s also good all by itself, or perhaps even drizzled with some cream!

This recipe is pretty much just like the one on Kitchen Stewardship, but I’ve upped the butter and maple syrup because I didn’t think there was enough sauce in the original recipe. I also did mine in a cast iron skillet, and they were perfect!

Peel about 4 ripe pears and cut them in half. Then, take a spoon and scoop out the seeded center and the fibrous stem part.

Maple Poached Pears Maple Poached Pears

Meanwhile, in a large cast iron skillet or other oven-safe pan, melt 4 Tbsp of butter .

Maple Poached Pears

Add in about 1/4 cup of maple syrup, preferably grade B, and the spices.

Maple Poached Pears

Let it cook until bubbly.

Maple Poached Pears

Then place the pears in, face-down.

Maple Poached Pears

Let it cook on medium heat for about 5 minutes to caramelize the bottoms of the pears, and then place the entire pan in the oven for 45 minutes or until a fork pokes through them easily.

Maple Poached Pears

Serve drizzled with the sauce. If desired, top with ice cream, whipped cream, or a drizzle of heavy cream.

Maple Poached Pears

Pure deliciousness!

NOTE: If you don’t have a cast iron skillet, you can still make these but the bottoms won’t caramelize as nicely. You can start the pears on the stove top, and then transfer the pears and sauce to an oven-safe baking dish to do the baking part. 

Maple Poached Pears
Author: 
Recipe type: dessert
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
If you don't have a cast iron or other oven-safe skillet, you can start them on the stove top and then transfer them to a baking dish instead. They won't caramelize as nicely but will still turn out yummy! Don't forget to scrape all the sauce into the baking dish with the pears.
Ingredients
  • 4 ripe pears
  • 4 Tbsp butter
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ginger
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Peel the pears, slice them in half, and scoop out the seeded center and tough stemmy parts with a spoon.
  3. Meanwhile, in a cast iron skillet melt the butter and add in the syrup. Let cook until bubbly, and then stir in the spices and vanilla.
  4. Place the pears, sliced side down, in the skillet and let cook on medium for 3-5 minutes to caramelize the bottoms
  5. Place the whole pan in the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, or until a fork pierces the pears easily.
  6. Serve hot, drizzled with the sauce. If desired, top with ice cream, whipped cream, or a drizzle of heavy cream.

 

fruit salad

Fresh Fruit Salad

This isn’t exactly ground-breaking food blogging here. There is absolutely nothing revolutionary about this at all.

But, like with other no-brainer posts I have on here (iced tea, popcorn, etc.), it’s just something else that’s “something I can eat,” and is something that’s especially helpful for a sugar-free diet. I thought I’d put it here simply because I’d like this blog to be a resource of ideas for eating on this diet, even the obvious ones.

Once you go off sugar, you find yourself really enjoying fruit more than you did before, and something about combining the right ones together in a bowl makes them even better. I find myself craving this a lot anymore, and it always hits the spot! If you’re having cravings for sweet things, give this a try. Don’t psyche yourself out and pretend it’s a brownie. It’s just something really yummy that will fill you up and taste great and satisfy those sweet taste buds.

I know everyone has their own take on fruit salads and everyone thinks they’re right. I, of course, am no exception, so I think that the way I make it is really the only right way. You can obviously do whatever you want, but this is what I expect from a fruit salad:

fruit salad

Fruits to use

  • Fruits I ALWAYS use: pineapple, red grapes (cut in half), red grapefruit, mandarin oranges, and at least one variety of berry for color.
  • Fruits I use when they look good and are affordable: strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwi, cherries (pitted and cut in half)
  • Fruits I never use: hard, crunchy fruits like apples (the texture is all wrong); melon (melon is good by itself, or in a melon salad, but I don’t think they go with the other fruits in a fruit salad); pears, peaches, and plums (I just don’t like their textures compared to the other fruits. Also, they get mushy and tend to get discolored quickly); bananas, unless it’s being eaten immediately with no leftovers (they get gross and slimy pretty quickly in a fruit salad).

fruit salad

Other things that add to it

  • A couple sprigs of mint, shredded or chopped, adds a really nice, cool surprise of a flavor.
  • Juice of a lime or lemon brightens up the flavor and helps to preserve the fruits.
  • Juice from the jar of mandarin oranges (make sure it’s 100% juice and not sugar syrup) and from the grapefruit after the segments have been cut out gives the juicy base for the salad.
  • Heavy cream, whipped up with an electric mixer, can be nice on top (though I prefer mine plain, with just the flavors of the fruits shining through.) If you use it, either have it unsweetened, or sweetened with only a bit of real maple syrup or stevia.

General guidelines

  • Use fresh fruit and only if it looks good. If the strawberries don’t smell like anything, then they won’t taste like anything and you should just skip them. It will only be as good as the fruit that’s in it!
  • The only canned fruit I use is mandarin oranges. I use it for the juice. Make sure it’s oranges packed in juice only and not a sugar syrup.
  • Try to cut everything into roughly equal size. It helps to get a nice variety of fruit in every bite if everything’s the same size.
  • In the winter, your fruit salad will be sparser because there aren’t as many fruits in season. I generally just get one variety of berry – whatever looks the best and is the best price – to add in for color in the winter. It gets too pricey otherwise.
  • If you’re making this ahead of time, don’t add the juice until just before serving. The juice can make certain fruits (mostly the strawberries) mushy after a while.
  • For the above reason, it’s also good to drain the juice before storing leftovers. You can keep it in a jar and pour some on as you need it, if you want.
  • Try to get as many colors in it as you can. Use red grapes instead of green. Put some blueberries in, even if it’s just a few. We eat with our eyes, so color matters!
  • Serve in a glass bowl, if you have one, because it’s pretty!

fruit salad